Last edited by Zunris
Monday, August 3, 2020 | History

3 edition of The relationship of physical activity to risk of testicular cancer found in the catalog.

The relationship of physical activity to risk of testicular cancer

Anil Srivastava

The relationship of physical activity to risk of testicular cancer

by Anil Srivastava

  • 230 Want to read
  • 24 Currently reading

Published by National Library of Canada in Ottawa .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis (M.Sc.) -- University of Toronto, 1998.

SeriesCanadian theses = -- Thèses canadiennes
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination1 microfiche : negative. --
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20828245M
ISBN 100612407241

  There is less evidence from observational studies regarding the relationship between weight loss and cancer risk. The best evidence to date comes from the bariatric surgery literature that shows that individuals who undergo bariatric surgery have a % lower risk of developing malignancy compared with weight- and age-matched controls who do not undergo surgery. 7 The benefits of . Abstract. The present review of epidemiologic studies of physical activity and genitourinary cancers (prostate, bladder, renal cell, and testicular cancers) suggests a weak inverse relation of physical activity to risk of prostate and renal cell cancer, with average risk decreases of less than 10% comparing high versus low levels of physical activity.

Having testicular cancer can affect your sexuality in both physical & emotional ways. The impact of these changes depends on many factors. Learn more now. 13 11 20 Some men may find that their sexuality and sense of intimacy are affected by treatment for testicular cancer. Learn more about: The side effects of surgery; The side effects of. Cook MB, Zhang Y, Graubard BI et al () Risk of testicular germ-cell tumours in relation to childhood physical activity. Br J Cancer – doi: / PubMed .

Testicular cancer is a relatively rare disease in Australia. The exact cause remains unknown, but there are several factors that may increase a man’s risk of developing testicular cancer. These risk factors include: Undescended testes (cryptorchidism) – men born with undescended testes are more likely to develop testicular cancer. Surgical. Liu X, Lv K: Cruciferous vegetables intake is inversely associated with risk of breast cancer: a meta-analysis. Breast , ; Tse G, Eslick GD: Cruciferous vegetables and risk of colorectal neoplasms: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Nutr Cancer , ; Galeone C, Pelucchi C, Levi F, Negri E, Franceschi S, Talamini R, Giacosa A, La Vecchia C: Onion and garlic use.


Share this book
You might also like
teachings of Silvanus and Clement of Alexandria

teachings of Silvanus and Clement of Alexandria

Extension of Nineteenth Street.

Extension of Nineteenth Street.

Beyond tokenism

Beyond tokenism

National information & communications technology (ICT) policy

National information & communications technology (ICT) policy

How to Use Novell NetWare 3.X

How to Use Novell NetWare 3.X

Birthplaces U.S.A.

Birthplaces U.S.A.

Glucocorticoid Hormone

Glucocorticoid Hormone

This is Islam

This is Islam

Facies models

Facies models

You are my love.

You are my love.

Small Farmers Guide to Raising Livestock and Poultry

Small Farmers Guide to Raising Livestock and Poultry

Three plays

Three plays

Core Concepts in Health 2000 Update

Core Concepts in Health 2000 Update

Photographs ...

Photographs ...

The relationship of physical activity to risk of testicular cancer by Anil Srivastava Download PDF EPUB FB2

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, 2nd edition, released in (), recommends that, for substantial health benefits and to reduce the risk of chronic diseases, including cancer, adults engage in to minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity, 75 to minutes of vigorous aerobic activity, or an equivalent combination of.

Making moderate to vigorous physical activity a part of your lifestyle lowers your risk of cancer and that of other chronic diseases, such as heart disease and diabetes.

Moderate to vigorous physical activity is exercise that makes you sweat and your heart beat faster. It includes walking, swimming, cycling, or running.

A growing body of research suggests that doing any kind. Physical activity as a risk factor was examined in nine studies of testicular cancer (3,4,26,()()() () (), seven studies of ovarian cancer (3,83,85.

A systematic review by New Zealand researchers seeks to clarify the relationship between physical activity and testicular cancer. Testicular cancer is common in men between the ages of 15 to 40 years, and with a rise in global incidences of testicular cancer, researchers seek to find evidence of risk factors.

One of the research areas of interest is how physical activity is associated. Several, but not all, studies have observed increased risks of testicular germ cell cancer (TGCC) associated with bicycling and other recreational activities.

To further examine whether physical activity (PA) in adolescence is associated with TGCC risk, the authors conducted a case-control study in western Washington State. Physical activity has been implicated as a risk factor in the development of testicular cancer (TC), but the relationship remains controversial.

This systematic review pooled available evidence regarding this association. Using Boolean search terms and following PRISMA guidelines, we examined the risk of TC across three categories of exposure: intensity (i.e. comparison of risk. A prospective study was carried out to examine the relationship between physical activity and incidence of cancers in men aged 40–59 years with full data on physical activity and without cancer at screening.

Physical activity at screening was classified as none/occasional, light, moderate, moderately-vigorous or vigorous. Physical activity and risk of testicular cancer: a systematic review Stephanie Huang1, Virginia Signal1, Diana Sarfati1, Caroline Shaw2, James Stanley1, Katherine McGlynn3 and Jason Gurney1* Abstract Background: Physical activity has been implicated as a risk factor in the development of testicular cancer (TC), but the relationship remains.

Testicular cancer is rare, but it’s the most common form of cancer in males 15 to Learn more about the symptoms, risk factors, diagnosis, stages, treatment, and complications of testicular. Thune I, Lund E () Physical activity and the risk of prostate and testicular cancer: a cohort study of 53 Norwegian men.

Cancer Causes Control 5: – CAS. The purpose of this review is to articulate how progress in epidemiological research on physical activity and cancer prevention can be made. This report briefly reviews the accumulated evidence for an etiological role of physical activity in the prevention of cancer of the colon, breast, prostate, testes, lung, endometrium, and ovary and summarizes the evidence for a causal association for.

Testicular cancer is cancer that develops in the testicles, a part of the male reproductive system. Symptoms may include a lump in the testicle, or swelling or pain in the scrotum. Treatment may result in infertility.

Risk factors include an undescended testis, family history of the disease, and previous history of testicular cancer. The most common type is germ cell tumors which are divided. Assessment of Confounders. Because physical activity at adolescence has been found to adversely affect testicular cancer risk and may be associated with smoking habits, frequency of adolescent physical activity was summed for both moderate and strenuous recreational activity, and quartiles were formed; the variable was modeled as continuous categorical (i.e., with the assumption of a common.

While there are many factors you can't change that increase your cancer risk, such as genetics and environment, there are others you can control.

In fact, estimates suggest that less than 30% of a person's lifetime risk of getting cancer results from uncontrollable factors. The rest you have the power to change, including your diet. The associations between recreational and occupational physical activity and the subsequent risk of prostate and testicular cancer were examined in a population-based cohort study of 53, men in Norway.

Age at study entry was 19 to 50 years. Information on physical activity was based on questionnaire responses and a brief clinical examination. Data collected between and in Ontario, Canada, as part of the Enhanced Cancer Surveillance Study were used to examine the relation between the frequency of recreational, and intensity of occupational, physical activity at various life periods, including cumulative and averaged lifetime activity and risk of testicular cancer.

In latethe Journal of Nutrition published a review of epidemiological studies on the relationship between physical activity and cancer. Here is some of what the researchers found. The American Cancer Society has updated its guideline for diet and physical activity for cancer prevention, with adjustments to reflect the most current evidence.

Being physically active and exercising can lower your cancer risk, help you have a healthy weight and lessen your risk for numerous chronic diseases. Just 30 minutes of physical activity 5 times a week can go a long way towards improving your health.

To get the most out of your physical activity, combine it with a healthy diet. For the remaining genitourinary cancers including kidney, testicular and bladder, there is insufficient evidence regarding the effect of physical activity.2, 5 For kidney cancer, an equal number of studies have found no effect or a beneficial effect of activity on risk.

30 For testicular cancer there has been some suggestion of an increased. You can detect testicular cancer by doing a monthly testicular self-exam. Such an exam is a way that men can look for signs of cancer of the testicles. To do a self-exam, follow these steps. The relationship between physical activity and colon cancer.

More than 50 studies have examined colorectal cancer in relation to physical activity. Research has consistently shown that adults who increase their physical activity, either in intensity, duration, or frequency, can reduce colon cancer risk by 30 to 40 percent.A dose–response relationship between physical activity and specific cancer risk was evident for several cancers, but given the inconsistent methods of measuring and categorizing physical activity levels in the various studies, meta-analyses, and pooled analyses, it was not possible to determine exact levels of physical activity that provide.